Saving Lives One Pint at a Time

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Saving Lives One Pint at a Time

Mrs. Danna Moore gets her blood taken on Thursday, Feb. 7. Many faculty also got involved and give back.

Mrs. Danna Moore gets her blood taken on Thursday, Feb. 7. Many faculty also got involved and give back.

Izabel Idiaz

Mrs. Danna Moore gets her blood taken on Thursday, Feb. 7. Many faculty also got involved and give back.

Izabel Idiaz

Izabel Idiaz

Mrs. Danna Moore gets her blood taken on Thursday, Feb. 7. Many faculty also got involved and give back.

Thursey Cook

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Lincoln Southwest held the blood drive on Thursday, Feb. 7.

The blood drive helps Southwest seniors get the chance to earn money toward their future college expenses.

“The community blood bank provides $10 for each unit collected and they figure out how much we learn,” Mr. Mark Watt said. “They make it available and the kids apply and if they are chosen, the money gets sent right to their college when they enroll in the fall.”

One pint was taken from every student which, in turn, could be given to up to three different people.

“It feels good to help others without expecting anything in return,” senior Ashley Kallhoff said.

Students signed up for certain time slots. When they arrived they were given paperwork to make sure they were qualified to give blood. Students got their finger pricked to check their iron levels and then were seated at donor chairs.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Volunteers distracted students as their blood was taken. Afterwards, students were given their choice of snacks and a drink to keep them hydrated and to prevent any light headedness.

Any students, age 16 and 17, had to get parent permission before giving blood. Any students below the age of 16 were not eligible to give blood.

Students felt that the experience was rewarding and the process was quite quick, lasting an average of 15 minutes to give blood and another 15 minutes to rest before going back to class.

“It feels pretty great to donate blood,”sophomore Grace Lonowski said. “It’s a good way to help out people in need.”

Volunteering to give blood was an easy way to give back.

“Giving back to society, I think is an important thing,” Watt said. “It’s great for kids to build that habit early in life. It doesn’t cost anybody and it’s on school time so it’s a great way to contribute.”

The Nebraska Blood Bank visits the school every year so the blood bank encourages you to donate next time they visit to support Southwest students and people in need.